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When Iggy Pop can’t live off his art, what chance do the rest have?

Very interesting article HERE. Although the “digital revolution” has been bemoaned by the music industry and photography so often that I don’t think people any hear it anymore.

But I think this is a different way of addressing the issue:
1) Using an example that is truly legendary
2) This quote:

But in truth, we do ask: Every time we go to a library or shop, we want it to be full of new books, and when we search various channels (legal and illegal) for new music and movies, we expect to find them. Someone has to produce this content – this art – and sadly, the shoemakers’ elves are all busy stitching elsewhere. And after it’s been produced, someone has to buy it. Or not buy it, as is more likely the case.

It comes down to a question of value: Do we value artists’ effort?

This was also a good excuse to look up stories about the man. Johnny Deep was ok, but Henry Rollins breaks it down pretty amazingly: “There he is, bleeding beautifuly…”

Marine Cpl. William Gadsby for Smithsonian Magazine

Back in August, I had the honor of photographing U.S. Marine Cpl. William Gadsby for Smithsonian Magazine. Gadsby suggested Ball’s Bluff Battlefield Regional Park, near Leesburg, Virginia, where he could actively show how his prosthetic (designed by Hugh Herr) allowed the freedom to hike and be active in different rough terrains.


Gadsby was wonderful to work with – gracious and happy to hit up different locations – as well as engaging and thoughtful: we talked about surfing, wartime history, philosophy, governmental use of statistics, organic foods, cultural differences between US and Europe, and – of course – lots of physiology, bio-engineering, and prosthodontics. He’s really pushing to make a difference in people’s lives, and spending time with him was an inspiring.

The Smithsonian Magazine article is online HERE.

Movie Mondays: Boston Layer Lapse

Boston Layer-Lapse from Julian Tryba on Vimeo.

I can’t help but think that this had to be influenced by Stephen Wilkes’ fine art project Day to Night

Movie Mondays – Eyes of Hitchcock

This is so good it couldn’t wait for a Monday. The rhythm of edit is spectacular.

Eyes of Hitchcock from Criterion Collection on Vimeo.

A brief history of the land called Israel/Palestine/Canaan/the Levant

This Land Is Mine from Nina Paley on Vimeo.

Its as if South Park got together with Quentin Tarantino and a historian.
The Who’s-killing-who viewer’s guide is helpful too: http://blog.ninapaley.com/2012/10/01/this-land-is-mine/

Movie Mondays – Francis

Straight up summer-camp nighttime campfire chills. Great stuff.

Richard Hickey – Francis from Not To Scale on Vimeo.

The depth of the problem

Words and numbers are just symbols. Graphics are symbols. There are times that using the right kind of symbol gets the same message across in a much more understandable way. This is a great example.

15,000 feet or, or THIS

I’m sure it is more complicated, with topography, currents, and all manner of variables. But as far as really translating a piece of the problem faced, this is staggering.

Movie Mondays: Light is Calling

I can’t even pretend to know what this is about or what it means, but man is it beautiful.

Movie Mondays: BTS – Nick Goepper’s slopestyle tricks

Visual technology is just amazing these days. And to operate the camera, one needs to be an athlete with serious skills.

US Navy Toys With Physics of Bouncy Balls

Super neat. Uses?